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AmigaOS 4.0 - About OS4 - Commands

CONFIGURENETINTERFACE Network
Purpose: To configure active network interface parameters.
Format: CONFIGURENETINTERFACE <interface name> [QUIET] [ADDRESS <address>] [NETMASK <netmask>] [BROADCASTADDRESS <broadcast address>] [DESTINATION | DESTINATIONADDR <destination address>] [METRIC <n>] [MTU <n>] [ALIASADDR <alias address>] [DELETEADDRESS <delete address>] [ONLINE | OFFLINE | UP | DOWN] [DEBUG <debug>] [COMPLETE <complete>] [CONFIGURE <configure>] [LEASE <lease>] [RELEASE | RELEASEADDRESS <release address>] [ID <identity>] [TIMEOUT <n>]
Template: INTERFACE/A, QUIET/S, ADDRESS/K, NETMASK/K, BROADCASTADDR/K, DESTINATION=DESTINATIONADDR/K, METRIC/K/N, MTU/K/N, ALIASADDR/K, DELETEADDR/K, ONLINE/S, OFFLINE/S, UP/S, DOWN/S, DEBUG/K, COMPLETE/K, CONFIGURE/K, LEASE/K, RELEASE=RELEASEADDRESS/S, ID/K, TIMEOUT/K/N
Path: C:CONFIGURENETINTERFACE
CONFIGURENETINTERFACE is used to configure the network interface parameters once the interface has been initialised by ADDNETINTERFACE.

Changes made using CONFIGURENETINTERFACE only apply to the current session and are not saved permanently.

The following arguments are supported:

INTERFACE <interface name> The name of the interface to be configured. This is a required parameter.
QUIET This option suppresses any error messages or progress reports. Also, if the program encounters an error it will flag this as failure code 5 which can be looked at using the 'if warn' shell script command. If this option is not in effect, failure codes will be more severe and all sorts of progress information will be displayed.
ADDRESS <address> This configures the IP address of the interface. The parameter you supply should be an IP address in dotted-decimal notation ("192.168.0.1"). Don't pick a symbolic host name as the system may not yet be in a position to talk to name resolution server and translate the symbolic name. In place of the IP address you can also specify "DHCP" (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol). As the name suggests, this will start a configuration process involving the DHCP protocol which should eventually yield the right IP address for this host. Note that this configuration procedure only works for Ethernet hardware.
NETMASK <netmask> This selects the subnet mask for the interface, which must be specified in dotted-decimal notation ("192.0.168.1"). In place of the subnet mask you can also specify "DHCP" (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol). As the name suggests, this will start a configuration process involving the DHCP protocol which should eventually yield the right subnet mask for this host. Note that this configuration procedure only works for Ethernet hardware.
BROADCASTADDR <bcaddr> This specifies the broadcast address to be used by this interface, which must be specified in dotted-decimal notation ("192.168.0.1") and only works with interfaces that support broadcasts in the first place (i.e. Ethernet hardware).
DESTINATION <destaddr>
DESTINATIONADDR <destaddr>
This specifies the address of the point-to-point partner for this interface, which must be specified in dotted-decimal notation ("192.168.0.1"). Only works for point-to-point connections, such as PPP.
METRIC <route> This configures the interface route metric value. Default is 0.
MTU <mtu> You can limit the maximum transmission size used by the TCP/IP stack to push data through the interface. The interface driver will have its own ideas about the maximum transmission size. You can therefore only suggest a smaller value than the driver's preferred hardware MTU size.
ALIAS <address> In addition to the primary interface address you can assign several aliases to it. These must be specified in dotted-decimal notation ("192.168.0.1"). Alias addresses are added after the primary interface address has been configured. You can add as many aliases as you like, provided you don't run out of memory.
DELETEADDR <address> This option removes an alias address from the list the interface is to respond to.
UP This configures the 'line state' of the interface; by specifying UP the protocol stack will attempt to transmit messages through this interface (even though it might not be online yet).
DOWN This configures the 'line state' of the interface; by specifying DOWN the protocol stack will no longer attempt to transmit messages through this interface (even though it might still be online).
OFFLINE This configures the 'line state' of the interface; by specifying OFFLINE the protocol stack will no longer attempt to transmit messages through this interface (even though it might still be online).
ONLINE This configures the 'line state' of the interface; by specifying ONLINE an attempt is made to put the underlying networking driver online. If that works, then the protocol stack will attempt to transmit messages through this interface.
DEBUG YES | NO You can enable debug output for this interface to help in tracking down configuration problems. At this time of writing, the debug mode will, if enabled, produce information on the progress of the DHCP configuration process.
COMPLETE YES | NO If you configure an interface in several steps, use this parameter in the final invocation of the program. It will tell the TCP/IP stack that the configuration for this interface is complete. This has the effect of causing the static route definition file to be reread, if necessary.
RELEASEADDRESS If an IP address was dynamically assigned to an interface, this switch will tell ConfigureNetInterface to release it. Note that you can only release what was previously allocated.
CONFIGURE DHCP You can use DHCP configuration for this interface and protocol stack internals, namely the list of routers (and the default gateway) to use and the domain name servers. This option allows you to bring up the complete network configuration in one single step. You can request that a particular IP address is assigned to this interface by the DHCP process by specifying CONFIGURE=DHCP and your choice of ADDRESS=xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.
TIMEOUT <time> If you're going to use DHCP configuration for any of the interfaces, a default timeout value of 60 seconds will limit the time an interface can take to be configured. This parameter allows you to use a different timeout value. Note that due to how the configuration protocol works, the timeout cannot be shorter than ten seconds.
LEASE <lease> This is a complex option which can be used to request how long an IP address should be bound to an interface. Several combinations of options are possible. Here is a short list: LEASE=300 or LEASE=300seconds - These request a lease of exactly 300 seconds, or five minutes.
LEASE=30min - This requests a lease of 30 minutes.
LEASE=2hours - This requests a lease of 2 hours.
LEASE=1day - This requests a lease of 1 day.
LEASE=4weeks - This requests a lease of 4 weeks. LEASE=infinite - This requests that the IP address should be permanently bound. Blank spaces between the numbers and the qualifiers are supported. The qualifiers are tested using substring matching, which means for example that "30 minutes" is the same as "30 min" and "30 m". Note that the requested lease time may be ignored by the DHCP server. After all, it is just a suggestion and not an order.
ID <name> This option works along with the CONFIGURE=DHCP process. It can be used to tell the DHCP server by which name the local host should be referred to. Some DHCP servers are on good terms with their local name resolution services and will add the name and the associated IP address to the local host database. The name you can supply here cannot be longer than 255 characters and must be at least 2 characters long. Keep it brief: not all DHCP servers have room for the whole 255 characters.

Notes:
If you tell an interface to go online then the program's return code will tell you if the command succeeded: a return value of 0 indicates success (the interface is now online), and a value of 5 indicates that it didn't quite work.

Configuring the address of an interface has two effects: first, the interface will be marked as 'up', meaning that the protocol stack will attempt to send messages through it when appropriate. Second, a direct route to the interface will be established.

Example 1:

   3.OS4:> CONFIGURENETINTERFACE ETH3COM OFFLINE
   CONFIGURENETINTERFACE: Interface "ETH3COM" state changed to "OFFLINE".

if the interface is active, a log message may also be displayed:


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Disclaimer: Amiga Auckland have prepared the above information for the use of its members based on our experiences and as such is subject to revision at any time. Amiga Auckland cannot guarantee any of the information and cannot be held accountable for any issues that may result from using it.


Copyright 2006 Amiga Auckland Inc. All rights reserved.
Revised: February 9, 2006.